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    3 Facts About Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery

    Last updated 10 months ago

    Cataract surgery is the leading solution for advanced cataracts that are causing gradual vision loss. During surgery, the cataract is removed with the natural lens of the eye, which is replaced by an artificial lens that restores the patient’s vision. This surgery is typically performed by hand by a skilled and experienced surgeon.  However now there is a high-tech option in cataract surgery, the Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery technique. Below, you will find some facts about this procedure that can help you understand why this development has created such excitement.

    Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery was invented at Newsom Eye
    Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery is so named because it was developed in the surgical facility at Newsom Eye. The innovative technology used for the procedure was derived from existing LASIK lasers after Dr. Newsom realized the potential for this application of the technology. After years of developing and refining the surgery, it is now offered by Newsom Eye and a growing number of clinics nationwide with the support of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

    Laser technology reduces surgical risks
    The use of the computerized laser in Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery has given the surgeon much better control in the creation of the micro-incisions made for cataract surgery.  The results are far more precise and repeatable than can be achieved in conventional surgeries.   

    Bladeless Surgery is not for all patients
    It is important to remember that all eyes are unique, so there is a possibility that other procedures may still be preferable over Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery for your particular case. Talk to an eye specialist today to begin determining which treatment is best suited for you.

    To find out if Newsom Bladeless Cataract Surgery will be right for you, schedule an appointment with Dr. Newsom at Newsom Eye in Tampa. Check us out online or call (888) 380-5289 to get the full story about our invention and how it can help you see clearly.

    3 Facts About Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery

    Last updated 10 months ago

    Cataract surgery is the leading solution for advanced cataracts that are causing gradual vision loss. During surgery, the cataract is removed with the natural lens of the eye, which is replaced by an artificial lens that restores the patient’s vision. This surgery is typically performed by hand by a skilled and experienced surgeon.  However now there is a high-tech option in cataract surgery, the Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery technique. Below, you will find some facts about this procedure that can help you understand why this development has created such excitement.

    Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery was invented at Newsom Eye
    Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery is so named because it was developed in the surgical facility at Newsom Eye. The innovative technology used for the procedure was derived from existing LASIK lasers after Dr. Newsom realized the potential for this application of the technology. After years of developing and refining the surgery, it is now offered by Newsom Eye and a growing number of clinics nationwide with the support of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

    Laser technology reduces surgical risks
    The use of the computerized laser in Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery has given the surgeon much better control in the creation of the micro-incisions made for cataract surgery.  The results are far more precise and repeatable than can be achieved in conventional surgeries.   

    Bladeless Surgery is not for all patients
    It is important to remember that all eyes are unique, so there is a possibility that other procedures may still be preferable over Newsom Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery for your particular case. Talk to an eye specialist today to begin determining which treatment is best suited for you.

    To find out if Newsom Bladeless Cataract Surgery will be right for you, schedule an appointment with Dr. Newsom at Newsom Eye in Tampa. Check us out online or call (888) 380-5289 to get the full story about our invention and how it can help you see clearly.

    Understanding How Your Eyes Work

    Last updated 12 months ago

    The human eye is a complex and delicate organ that allows people to see and observe the world around them. But how exactly does the eye translate light into the visual perception of objects, people, and places? Below is a brief and simple guide to help you understand exactly that.

    The Cornea
    The cornea is a clear, dome-shaped structure that forms the outer surface of the eye. When light bounces from an object to your eyes, it must first pass through the cornea, where it is then refracted, or bent, through the pupil towards the lens. In addition to protecting the eye from infection, dust, and other foreign objects, the cornea is responsible for most of the eye’s focusing power.

    The Lens
    Light then passes through the lens, a transparent biconvex structure which, when young and healthy, is flexible and can actually change shape to focus the eye. With the cornea, the lens is responsible for making sure that light is focused directly on the sensitive tissues of the retina.

    The Retina
    The retina is composed of a very thin, specialized layer of tissue that contains the photoreceptors. The photoreceptors of the eye—known as the rods and cones—are specialized structures that are able to recognize photons of light and translate them into the nervous signals recognized by the brain. At the center of the retina lies the macula, a region where cones are concentrated to provide sharp central vision in well-lit situations.

    Once light has been translated into nerve signals by the retina, it is sent to the brain via the optic nerve. The images are then produced, organized, and perceived by the visual cortex of the brain. Would you like to learn more about how your eyes work and how to keep them healthy? Contact the eye care experts at Newsom Eye by calling (888) 380-5289 to schedule an appointment with one of our experienced ophthalmologists.

    What You Need to Know About Glaucoma

    Last updated 1 year ago

    Glaucoma refers to a common, serious group of diseases that can affect the optic nerve. In the past, glaucoma was associated with increases in the fluid pressure of the eye that eventually causes blindness, but recent research has shown that many cases of glaucoma occur at low or normal intraocular pressures. A skilled ophthalmologist can identify the progression of glaucoma and provide the treatment necessary to maintain optimal vision. At Newsom Eye, our ophthalmologists have extensive experience in the diagnosis and treatment of the various forms of glaucoma, including the following:

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma
    Open angle glaucoma is the most common form of glaucoma and accounts for approximately 90 percent of all cases. This type tends to develop very slowly and increases in severity over time as the fluid pressure in the eye builds. The increased intraocular pressure is due to a slow blockage of the fluid drainage canals within the eye. Vision is lost slowly, beginning with the periphery of the visual field.  The effects of glaucoma can not be reversed but it can be controlled so early detection is important. 

    Acute Narrow Angle Glaucoma
    Also known as angle-closure glaucoma, this form of glaucoma is less common, but can lead to complete blindness very quickly. Unlike open angle glaucoma in which the fluid drainage is only slowly blocked, narrow angle glaucoma is characterized by a rapidly developing blockage. This condition is a medical emergency, and is often accompanied by very noticeable symptoms, such as severe pain and blurred vision. Without treatment, vision can be lost in hours or days.

    Sun Exposure and Cataracts

    Last updated 1 year ago

    Cataracts occur when the transparent lens of the eye becomes clouded and opaque, preventing the normal amount of light from reaching the retina. While this condition becomes increasingly likely with age, there are a variety of other factors that have been implicated in the development of cataracts—including exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

    Ultraviolet radiation which is made up of two harmful types of light waves, UVA and UVB, has properties that enable it to penetrate skin and promote the development of cataracts. With long-term or excessive exposure, UVB can cause pigment changes in the lens that can lead to cataracts. UVB is also thought to play a role in the development of macular degeneration. UVA, the part of the ultraviolet spectrum responsible for tanning the skin, is thought to be responsible for promoting the release of oxidants. Oxidants are oxygen free radicals that can be very damaging to any tissue, and are implicated in cataract development.

    If you or a loved one is suffering from cataracts, consider seeking treatment from the eye care experts at Newsom Eye. Contact our practice at (888) 380-5289 to schedule an appointment with one of our cataract specialists.

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